Announcing the Global Asia Series (GLASS) - a new AMT-LGI initiative

The AMT and LGI research profiles are pleased to announce a new joint initiative: GLASS (Global Asia Series) Visiting Scholars. Each term we will invite a leading or emerging international scholar whose work is influential across disciplinary, regional and national boundaries within Asia and beyond.

About GLASS

The AMT and LGI research profiles are pleased to announce a new joint initiative: GLASS (Global Asia Series). Each term we will invite a leading or emerging international scholar whose work is influential across disciplinary, regional and national boundaries within Asia and beyond.

GLASS will bring to Leiden University prominent scholars working in fields associated with Asian studies, whose work has had or has the potential to have an impact across disciplinary, regional and national boundaries within Asia and beyond. 

Thus, at one level, the “global” in the title of the series is meant to reflect this aspect of scholarship and knowledge production from various fields comprising Asian studies.  At another level, it is meant to critically consider the question of “globalization,” historically and in its contemporary configurations through particular locations (not just in the geographically bounded sense) and experiences of Asia.  

Such a critical consideration may ask how Asia is itself a global formation while at the same time participating in the globalization of multiple aspects of human experience. Topics may include competing conceptions and categories of modernity and tradition, the changing shape of political communities, state-society formations and urban-rural relationships; modes of domination and resistance; forms and practices of identification; routes, patterns and hierarchies of economic and cultural production, exchange, dissemination, circulation and consumption; artistic practices, cultural institutions and media technologies; emergent social, political, ecological, and aesthetic movements; and histories of human migration and its effects. 

Through these two lenses, engaging the ‘global’ from the perspective of Asia and Asian studies, this series seeks to bring together the concerns of the AMT and LGI research profiles.

Visit the new GLASS website.

AMT contact: Anup Grewal 
LGI contact:  Carolyn Nakamura


21-23 November 2012: Engseng Ho

We are delighted to announce that the first GLASS Visiting Scholar will be Engseng Ho, Professor of Anthropology from Duke University. After graduating from Stanford with undergraduate degrees in economics and anthropology, Professor Ho spent a few years as an international economist in Singapore before pursuing a masters and PhD at the University of Chicago. There he regularly met with multiple mentors in anthropology, Arabic and Islamic studies. His dissertation on a society of Yemeni people that had a 500-year history of migration broke the mold of a traditional anthropology program that focuses on the study of contemporary society in one geographic locality.

Professor Ho spent two years in Yemen conducting research that revealed a rich history of a people who traveled throughout East Africa, the Arab world, India and Southeast Asia, intermarrying and contributing to the establishment of new Muslim religious, political and legal institutions. The dissertation grew into a book: The Graves of Tarim: Genealogy and Mobility across the Indian Ocean, published by the University of California Press in 2006.

Professor Ho's work tells of how Muslim sailors, scholars, merchants, and settlers from Yemen have made a place for themselves across the Indian Ocean for the last 500 years. Through the ties of a literate and religiously-inspired diaspora that has rivaled and challenged European expansion, Hadrami voyagers shape a world beyond the Euro- American imagination. Professor Ho shows how the study of non-European texts and histories is essential to understanding the tensions and dynamics of globalization--both in the past and today. His work challenges the modernist categories that have informed anthropology and offers a model of how to chart the emergence of regional worlds.


23-26 April 2013: Mrinalini Sinha

Mrinalini Sinha is Alice Freeman Palmer Professor in the Department of History and Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature (by courtesy) at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She has written on various aspects of the political history of colonial India, with a focus on anti-colonialism, gender, and transnational approaches. She has written numerous works including the books: Specters of Mother India: The Global Restructuring of an Empire (2006) and Colonial Masculinity: The 'manly Englishman' and the 'effeminate Bengali' in the late nineteenth century (1995). She has recently become interested in the different forms of political imaginings, beyond the nation-state, that animated anti-colonial thought in India at least until the interwar period. Currently, she is a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation 2012 Fellow in the Humanities. Her Guggenheim project, with the title “Complete Political Independence: The Curious History of a Nationalist Indian Demand,” will explore the contingency of the development of the nation-state form in India.


 
Last Modified: 23-10-2012