Conference Participants

Adam McKeown - Keynote

Department of History
Columbia University
New York, NY USA
(email)

Adam McKeown is a professor of history at Columbia University, where he offers courses on the histories of world migration, globalization and drugs. He wrote Melancholy Order: Asian Migration and the Globalization of Borders (2008), “Chinese Emigration in Global Context, 1850-1940,” Journal of Global History 5 (2010): 95-124, and “Global Migration, 1846-1940,” Journal of World History 15 (2004). He is now working on the history of globalization since 1760.

Frank Pieke - Keynote discussant

Professor of Chinese Studies
LIAS (School of Asian Studies-China)
Leiden University
The Netherlands
(email)

Frank Pieke studied cultural anthropology at the University of Amsterdam and the University of California, Berkeley, where he received his Ph.D. in 1992 on The Ordinary and the Extraordinary: An Anthropological Study of Chinese Reform and Political Protest. Between 1986 and 1995 he was university lecturer in the anthropology and sociology of modern China at Leiden University. Between 1995 and 2010 he was university lecturer in the modern politics and society of China and fellow of St Cross College at the University of Oxford. In Oxford his duties included founding director of the university's China Centre, director of the government-funded British Inter-University China Centre, and Vice-Master of St. Cross College. He was appointed chair professor in modern China studies at Leiden University in 2010. His research focuses on the anthropology of the Chinese administration and politics, international migration to and from China, and globalization, ethnicity and diversity in China and Europe. His most recent book is The Good Communist: Elite Training and State Building in Today's China (Cambridge University Press, 2009)

Henryk Alff

Postdoctoral Researcher
Centre for Development Studies (ZELF)/Institute of Geographic Sciences
Freie Universität Berlin
Germany
(email)

Henryk Alff is a post-doctoral researcher at the Centre for Development Studies (ZELF) of Freie Universität Berlin. His main research interests are translocal and -national migration/mobility and socio-economic and political impacts of China’s rise in its borderlands. Henryk received his PhD in human geography from the University of Potsdam in 2010 with a thesis on the role of transnational social networks in the migration process of Mongolia’s Kazakhs since the end of socialism, based on one year of fieldwork in Kazakhstan and Western Mongolia. His current project, which is part of the Crossroads Asia competence network, deals with the development of small-scale trade in the borderlands of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Xinjiang. At the focus of his research are the interconnections of small-scale trade flows and the shift of modernisation.     

 

Non Arkaraprasertkul

PhD Candidate
Department of Anthropology
Harvard University

Non Arkaraprasertkul is a Ph.D. candidate in Anthropology at Harvard University. He was a Fulbright Scholar and a recipient of the Asian Cultural Council Fellowship at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) where he studied architecture and urban design. He also taught at MIT as a Visiting Lecturer in Architecture and Urban Design (2007-2008) and is a member of the global MIT-SIGUS Alumni Group. He is interested in modern Chinese history, urban anthropology, anthropology of China, urbanism and housing, urban political economy, Marxism, and history and theory of modern architecture.

Michal Biran

Professor
Department of Asian and African Studies
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Israel
(email)

Michal Biran (PhD 2000, HU) is an Associate Professor at the department of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies and at the department of East Asian Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her books include Qaidu and the Rise of the Independent Mongol State in Central Asia (Curzon, 1997), The Empire of the Qara Khitai in Eurasian History: Between China and the Islamic World (Cambridge University Press, 2005, 2008) and Chinggis Khan (Oxford: Oneworld publications, 2007). She has co-edited Mongols, Turks and Others: Eurasian Nomads and the Sedentary World (with Reuven Amitai, Leiden: Brill, 2005) and Eurasian Nomads As Agents of Cultural Change (With Reuven Amitai, Forthcoming in Hawaii University Press). She is now working on migrations in Mongol Eurasia and on the cultural history of Ilkhanid Baghdad.

Edward Boyle

PhD candidate
Faculty of Law and Political Science
Hokkaido University
Japan
(email)

Edward Boyle is a doctoral candidate at the Graduate School of Law and Politics at Hokkaido University.  Having focused on the issue of state modernization in the Middle East at SOAS, University of London, and subsequently investigated the uses of cartography in the expansion of Japanese state control over Hokkaido in the early modern period, his current work seeks to explain the relations of state sovereignty to territory.  The specific empirical site remains the manner in which Hokkaido has been recognized from both within and without as Japanese, but the intersection of this recognition of state sovereignty over territory in one particular East Asian locale with the manner in which this represented the ‘expansion’ of a European system of sovereign state entities itself in the process of construction speaks to wider issues of sovereignty and territory in our contemporary world.

Anna Grasskamp

PhD Candidate
ICD (Art History)
Leiden University
The Netherlands
(email)

Anna Grasskamp is currently working on her PhD project Cultivated Curiosities. A Comparative Study of Chinese Artifacts in European Kunst- und Wunderkammern and European Curiosities in Chinese Elite Collections funded by a four-year grant by the Hulsewé-Wazniewski Foundation. She has studied Chinese Languages and Culture, Art History and Comparative Art History in Vienna, Beijing and Leiden, BA Sinology (with high distinction, 2006), 1. Diplom Art History (with high distinction, 2006), MPhil Western and Asian Art Histories in Comparative Perspective (2008). Ms. Grasskamp has presented her work in English, Dutch and German at several venues including The end of ‘-ist’ and the Future of Art History, Princeton 2012; China: Globalization and Glocalization, Leiden 2011; the Third Colloquies on East Asian Art History, Heidelberg 2011; the Annual Conference of the Renaissance Society of  America, Montreal 2011; Global Studies, Karlsruhe 2010; and by invitation from Vereniging van Vrienden der Aziatische Kunst in 2010.

Tineke D'Haeseleer

Lecturer
LIAS (School of Asian Studies - China)
Leiden University
The Netherlands
(email)

Tineke d'Haeseleer studied Sinology at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium, where she obtain her Licentiaat (MA) in 2000. She received her Ph.D. from Cambridge University in 2011, with the dissertation "Northeast Asia during the Tang Dynasty: Relations of the Tang Court with Koguryŏ, Bohai, and Youzhou-Yingzhou". She is currently employed at Leiden University as a lecturer in Premodern China. Research interests include the history of Sino-Korean relations and Manchuria throughout the ages, and Tang dynasty history.

Iftekhar Iqbal

Associate Professor
Department of History
Dhaka University
Bangladesh
(email)

Iftekhar Iqbal (PhD, Cambridge) is Associate Professor of History at Dhaka University. His recent book, The Bengal Delta (Palgrave, 2010), examines the political-ecological dynamics of the region in colonial times with a focus on agrarian economy and wellbeing. The book received Honorable Mention by the inaugural Bernard S. Cohn Prize Committee of the Association for Asian Studies. Iqbal is a holder of the British Academy Visiting Fellowship (2008) and an elected member of the Cambridge Commonwealth Society.

As a Georg Forster Fellow (2012-13) of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation at Humboldt University, Iqbal works on “Rivers and trans-regional integration: environment, culture and communication across the Eastern Himalayan-Tibetan Watershed, 1840-1947”. In particular, Iqbal will study the modern history of Yunnan, Myanmar, Assam and Bengal in a view to situate trans-regional forces of ecology in the territorially-bounded development practices of the nation-state.

Daisy Kim

PhD Candidate
Department of Political Science
Johns Hopkins Univeristy

Daisy Kim is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. As a Fulbright Junior Researcher, she is conducting dissertation research on the relationship between immigration and state-society relations in South Korea. She has interned at the US Embassy in Seoul in 2006 and at the Korea Migrant Women's Center in 2010. She holds a MA in East Asian Studies from Stanford University and a BA in Political Economy from Georgetown University.

Rotem Kowner

Professor
Department of Asian Studies
University of Haifa
Israel
(email)

Rotem Kowner is Professor of Japanese history at the University of Haifa, Israel. He has published widely on wartime behavior and attitudes in modern Japan and is currently working on the racial nexus between Japan and the West since the sixteenth century. Among his recent books are T he Forgotten Campaign (2005), Historical Dictionary of the Russo-Japanese War (2006), and From White to Yellow: vol. I. The Japanese in European Racial Thought, 1300-1735 (forthcoming) as well as the edited volumes The Impact of the Russo-Japanese War (2007), Rethinking the Russo-Japanese War (2007), and Race and Racism in Modern East Asia: Western and Eastern Constructions (2012, with Walter Demel).

Vu Duc Liem

Lecturer
Southeast Asian Studies Program
Chulalongkorn University
Thailand
(email)

Vu Duc Liem is a lecturer in Southeast Asian History at Hanoi National University of Education-HNUE. He received a B. A. in history in 2008 and a M.A. in Southeast Asian history in 2010 from HNUE, and a M.A. in Southeast Asian Studies at Chulalongkorn University-CU, Thailand with financial support from the Rockefeller Foundation. He is currently a Research fellow at Asian Research Institute, National University of Singapore where he conducts a research on the reconstruction of the early nineteenth century Vietnam political space. His main interest is the politico-economic history of eighteenth and nineteenth century Vietnam: changing geopolitics and the Vietnamese early modern state making project. 


Leo Lucassen (Master of Ceremonies)

Professor of Social and Economic History (Chair)
Leiden Univeristy
The Netherlands
(email)

Leo Lucassen studied Social and Economic History at the University of Leiden (MA in 1985). In 1990 he was granted a PhD (cum laude) from Leiden for his dissertation on the history of Gypsies in the Netherlands 1850-1940. In 1989-1990 he was attached to the Law Faculty of the University of Nijmegen and in 1990-1991 to the Faculty of Social Sciences of the University of Leiden. Between 1991 and 1996 he worked as fellow of the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences (KNAW) at the History Department in Leiden and in 1996 received the D.J. Veegensprijs of the Hollandse Maatschappij van Wetenschappen. In 1998 he moved to the University of Amsterdam (UvA) where he directed a NWO pioneer project on the assimilation of immigrants in the Netherlands. In the year 2002-2003 he was fellow of the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study (NIAS) in Wassenaar. In 2005 he returned to Leiden, where he shares the chair of Social History with prof. Wim Willems. Since September 2007 Leo Lucassen is full time professor of Social History at the Leiden History Department.

Ethan Mark (Session Chair)

Lecturer
LIAS (School of Asian Studies - Japan)
Leiden University
The Netherlands
(email)

Ethan Mark specializes in modern Japanese history, with particular expertise in Japanse imperialism and the social and cultural history of the 1920s-1940s. 

He recently completed the translation portion of a second major project, an English-language edition of Japanese historian Yoshimi Yoshiaki’s classic study Kusa no ne no fashizumu: Nihon minshû no sensô taiken (Grass-Roots Fascism: The War Experience of the Japanese People), a revolutionary account of the war experience of ordinary Japanese from the “ground-up.” In consultation with Professor Yoshimi, he is currently completing an analytical translator’s introduction and accompanying annotation. 

His article “Asia’s Transwar Lineage: Nationalism, Marxism, and Greater Asia,” which appears in the August 2006 edition of the Journal of Asia Studies, represents a part of his forthcoming major scholarly project, a history of evolving notions of national identity, “Asia” and “Asianness” within and across borders in modern Japan, East-, Southeast-, and South Asia, within a regional and global context of dramatic social change, struggle, and crisis in the years 1900-1950.

Carole McGranahan

Associate Professor
Department of Anthropology
University of Colorado
USA
(email)

Carole McGranahan is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Colorado. She received a PhD in Anthropology and History from the University of Michigan in 2001. Her research specialities are 20th-21st century Tibet, and issues of colonialism and empire, history and memory, refugees and citizenship, national belonging, gender, war, and anthropology as theoretical storytelling. She is the author of Arrested Histories: Tibet, the CIA, and Histories of a Forgotten War (2010), of Imperial Formations (with Ann Laura Stoler and Peter Perdue, 2007), and of a special issue of Cultural Anthropology on "Self-Immolation as Protest in Tibet" (with Ralph Litzinger, 2012). Currently, she is working on an edited volume with John Collins on “Ethnographies of U.S. Empire,” and is in the middle of a new research project with Tibetans in India, Nepal, New York City, and Toronto titled  “Refugee Citizenship: Tibetan Practices of Political Subjectivity in Diaspora.”

Rajashree Mazumder

PhD candidate
Department of History
University of California, Los Angeles
USA
(email)

I am a sixth year Ph.D. candidate from History Department of University of California, Los Angeles. I specialize in the South/Southeast Asia with a specific focus on “Indian Immigration to Colonial Burma 1880-1940.” I completed my archival research in various cities in Britain, India and Myanmar between 2009-10 and am currently writing my dissertation. Before coming to the United States for my Ph.D., I was a student at Delhi University, India where I completed my undergraduate, Masters and M.Phil degrees. This past academic year (2011-12), I have also been teaching two research/writing undergraduate seminar courses on “Modern India” and “Migration in the Indian Ocean Arena in the Modern Period.”

Oliver Moore

Lecturer
LIAS (School of Asian Studies - China)
Leiden University
The Netherlands
(email)

Oliver Moore gained his BA in Chinese at London University (SOAS). He studied and worked for three years in Shanghai, during and since which period he worked in law and advertising. His PhD (Cambridge, 1993) is a social histiory of civil service examinations in Tang and early Song China. He worked for five years (1993-1998) in the Asian Department of the British Museum before joining the Chinese Department at Leiden University as Lecturer in the Art and Material Culture of China. Since 2011 he has combined his lectureship at Leiden with responsibility for the China collections of the National Museum of Ethnology, Leiden (Museum Volkenkunde). He is responsible there for the present exhibition of terracotta warriors on loan from China. His research is directed towards questions concerning forms and uses of visual images and inscription in several periods of imperial and modern Chinese history. He will soon finish a book on the history of early photography in China.

Publications:
Rituals of Recruitment in Tang China: Reading An Annual Programme in Collected Statements by Wang Dingbao (870-940), Leiden: E.J.Brill, 2004 [407 pp]

Reading the Past: Chinese, London: British Museum Press, 2000 [80 pp.]

“Zou Boqi (1819-1869), Map-maker and Photographer”, for Kenneth Hammond ed., The Human Tradition in Modern China. Rowman & Littlefield, forthcoming, 2007

"The Dongyang Cave, Art, Society and China", in Kitty Zijlmans, ed., Site-Seeing:Places in Culture, Time and Space. Leiden: CNWS Publications, 2006: 53-87.

"Violence Un-scrolled: Cultic and Ritual Emphases in Painting Guan Yu”, Arts Asiatiques 58 (2003): 86-97

Henri Myrttinen

Postdoctoral Researcher
Nordic Institute for Asian Studies
Copenhagen, Denmark
(email)

Henri Myrttinen is currently an associated post-doc researcher with the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies in Copenhagen, Denmark. His research focuses on the gendered identity construction processes amongst members of gangs, martial arts groups and ritual arts groups in Timor-Leste. He completed his Ph.D. in Conflict and Peace Studies at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, in 2011 with a Ph.D. thesis focusing on intersectionalities between violence and masculinities amongst members of violence-prone groups in Timor-Leste. 

Sugata Nandi

Assistant Professor
Department of History
West Bengal State University
Kolkata, India
(email)

Rudolph Ng

Research Fellow
Asia and Europe in a Global Context (Cluster of Excellence)
University of Heidelberg
Germany
(email)

Thien-Huong Ninh

PhD Candidate
Department of Sociology
University of Southern California

Thien-Huong Ninh is a doctoral candidate in Sociology at the University of Southern California. Her dissertation emerges at the intersection of literatures on immigrant integration and diasporas. It examines how immigrants become a diaspora or remain as an ethnic group through transnational religious practices. The study compares Vietnamese immigrants of two religious traditions in the U.S. and Cambodia: Catholicism and Caodaism. 

Kiri Paramore

Lecturer
LIAS (School of Asian Studies - Japan)
Leiden University
The Netherlands
(email

Originally from Australia, Kiri earned his Ph.D. at the University of Tokyo, has taught for five years at Leiden as university lecturer, and has just finished a one year appointment as visiting research professor in the Institute of Chinese Literature and Philosophy, Academia Sinica. It was hot, but too short. Publications include Ideology and Christianity in Japan (Routledge, 2009) and articles on Knowledge History, Confucianism and Christianity in the Journal of Japanese Studies, the Journal of Religious History, and the Japanese Journal of Religious Studies among others.

Current scholarly projects include a book about Japanese Confucianism, and a series of articles on the history of knowledge in early-modern Japan focussing on transnational, especially Chinese, influence. He also continues to write on the history of Christianity. Hobbies include surfing during the Christmas break, and lego and children’s television during the rest of the year.

Shincha Park

PhD candidate
Department of History
Binghamton University
USA
(email)

Shincha Park is a Ph.D student at Department of Sociology, State University of New York at Binghamton. He finished BA in International Relations at Ritsumeikan University and MA in Sociology at SUNY-Binghamton. His research focuses on international migration, especially questions of international regime of mobility control, nationality and citizenship, statelessness in the world, and rights and social empowerment of migrants, refugees, minorities, and non-citizens. He is currently working on the issue of citizenship and nationality policies and situation of migrants in Japan in comparison with other Asian countries, and historical development of ‘otherness’ embedded in those practices. He also serves as a research assistant at the Afrasian Research Centre, Ryukoku University, Japan.

Peter Pels (Session Chair)

Professor of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology
Leiden University
The Netherlands
(email)

Peter Pels graduated in 1993 on a study of the colonial contacts between Dutch Catholic missionaries and a mountain people in Tanzania. Since then he has studied the introduction of modern political institutions in African countries, the history and anthropology of colonialism, the representation of Africa in modern European history, the history of anthropology and African studies, social science ethics and methodology, and the globalization of religious repertoires (especially in terms of Christianity, “animism” and New Age discourse). His most recent interests focus on the religious and secular aspects of conceptions of nature and technology, of the modern culture of materiality and object categories, and of science fiction.

Peter Pels currently supervises research in African politics and conflict-management, the landscapes of African water development, the heritage of African slavery, US American cyberculture, consumerism in Greece, the representation of East African refugees, and nomadism and conservation policies in Mongolia.

Rosalien van der Poel

PhD candidate
ICD (Art History)
Leiden University
The Netherlands

Rosalien van der Poel studied Art History/World Art Studies at Leiden University. Currently she is related to Leiden University Institute for Cultural Disciplines as a PhD candidate. Besides her part-time job as Chef Cabinet and Protocol at Leiden University she works on her PhD project Art 'traffic' between China and the Netherlands: The circuits of Chinese export painting in the nineteenth century. Since some years she is also active as general secretary of the board of The Asian Art Society in the Netherlands and as associate researcher of the National Museum of Ethnology in Leiden. 

Van der Poel presented her work at Visualizing Asia in the Modern World, MIT/Princeton, 2012; Art Histories Inter-areas/Border-Crossing, AAS/ICAS, Honolulu, 2011; AAS-Dissertation workshop Borders, migration, and transnational flows: Asia in motion, Honolulu 2011; China: Globalization and Glocalization, Leiden 2011; Canton and Nagasaki Compared, 1730-1830, Chinese, Japanese and Dutch relations, Guangzhou and Macao, 2007; and ICAS, Macao: The East-West Crossroads, Macao, 2013 (not confirmed yet). Furthermore, she gives lectures on request, on subjects as Chinese 'export' paintings and the Terracotta Army. 

Her publications are:

- ‘Ten winter views in Tartary painted on canvas. Chinese export winter landscapes in the National Museum of Ethnology’, forthcoming in: Orientations, Hong Kong, 2013.

- ‘From Canton to Leiden. Chinese export paintings in the National Museum of Ethnology’, forthcoming in: ‘China Trade’ Merchants and Artists (1760-1860) – New Historical and Cultural Perspectives, Macau Ricci Institute, Macau, winter 2012.

- ‘The Westward Movement of Chinese Export Harbour Views: Significant Paintings with a Social Function’, forthcoming in: Shilin, Journal of Young Sinology, Leiden University, June 2012.

- ‘Ten stuks wintergezigten in Tartarijen op doek geschilderd - Chinese export winter landscapes in the National Museum of Ethnology’, in: Aziatische Kunst, Journal of The Asian Art Society in the Netherlands, Vol. 1, March 2011.

- ‘China back in the frame. A comparative study of Canton, Whampoa and Macao harbour views in the Leiden Museum of Ethnology and in the Guangzhou Museum’, in: Transactions Canton and Nagasaki compared, 1730-1830, Chinese, Japanese and Dutch relations. Leiden, Intercontinenta Series No. 26, Institute for the History of European Expansion History Dept., Leiden University, October 2009.


Ratna Saptari (Session Chair)

Lecturer 
Institute for Cultural Anthropology
Leiden University
The Netherlands
(email)

Ratna Saptari studied anthropology at the University of Indonesia (MA 1984) and at the University of Amsterdam (PhD 1995). Saptari is coordinator of the IIAS-funded Changing Labour Relations in Asia (CLARA) programme. She organized several panels and conferences in collaboration with research/teaching institutions in Europe and Asia focusing on topics such as labour, migration, domestic service, social movements and histories of subaltern groups.

In addition to several articles and book chapters on these themes, she has also co-edited a number of books: The Household and Beyond: Cultural Notions and Social Practices in the Study of Gender in Indonesia; Labour in Southeast Asia: Local Processes in a Globalized World; and on the politics of history-writing Pemikiran Kembali Penulisan Sejarah Indonesia (Rethinking Indonesian History-Writing).
Ratna Saptari is currently writing on 'The Making and Remaking of the Cigarette Labour Communities in East Java: a comparative study of three cigarette towns, 1913-2003’; ‘Decolonisation and Urban Labour in Indonesia (1920s to 1965): Continuity and Change’and ‘The Cultures of Tobacco in Indonesia and India.’

Willem van Schendel (Session Chair)

Professor of Modern Asian History (Chair)
University of Amsterdam
International Institute of Social History
The Netherlands
(email)

My current research deals with (a) Borderlands and the social consequences of the mobility of people and goods. Borderlands are important sites for studying migrating people and moving commodities as well as the shifting networks of solidarity, remittances, knowledge, meaning and power that result from such practices. My main focus is on the borderlands of India, Bangladesh and Burma. (b) Mobile cash-crop production systems and trajectories of globalization. I am interested in the production of commodities for world markets, how production was embedded in agrarian societies, and under which circumstances these systems could be moved from one (colonial) society to another. Why were plans to establish a new cash-crop production system successful in one case but not another? How did different combinations of labour, land, water, capital and knowledge enable or disable such systems? My main focus is on the global movement of indigo production in the late 18th and 19th centuries, with special attention to British India (now India/Bangladesh) and the Netherlands East Indies (Indonesia).

http://www.willemvanschendel.com/

 

Florian Schneider

Lecturer
LIAS (School of Asian Studies - China)
Leiden University
The Netherlands

Florian Schneider's research interests include questions of governance and public administration in the PRC, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, political communication strategies and political content of popular Chinese entertainment, recent Chinese economic developments, as well as Chinese foreign policy.

Florian’s most recent work focused on the political contents of mainland Chinese films and popular Chinese television series, including their production process, censorship, broadcasting, and audience reception. Methodologically his work has combined critical discourse analysis, semiotics, and iconography, as well as the analysis of semi-structured qualitative interviews.

A current project deals with staged mass-media events in mainland China, such as the Beijing Olympic Games Opening Ceremony in 2008, the 60th Anniversary of the People’s Republic of China in 2009, and the Shanghai Expo in 2010. The project explores how the Chinese leadership makes use of such events to promote a national identity and legitimize its own rule. A primary question in this regard is how concepts of tradition and of modernization (or progress) feature into such events, and what impact they have on the interaction between China and other actors in the international community.

Radhika Singha (Session Chair)

Professor of Modern Indian History
Jawaharlal Nehru University
New Delhi, India
(email)

Radhika Singha teaches history at the Centre for Historical Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. Her research themes focus on the social history of crime and criminal law, and on identification practices in relation to colonial governmentality. The mobilisation of human resources from India for world war one has become a second, often intersecting, track of interest. She has published a book entitled A Despotism of Law: Crime and Justice in Early Colonial India (Oxford University Press, 1998), and in relation to the themes of this network articles on identification practices, law and infrastructural power, and colonial travel documents.

Olga Kanzaki Sooudi

Postdoctoral researcher
Amsterdam School for Cultural Analysis
University of Amsterdam
The Netherlands
(email)

Olga Kanzaki Sooudi is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Amsterdam School for Cultural Analysis, University of Amsterdam.  She received her PhD in Anthropology from Yale University.  She is currently revising her book for publication (under contract), an ethnographic study of Japanese migrant artists in New York City and returnees in Tokyo.  Based on over two years of fieldwork in these two cities, it examines mobility as creative practice of self-reinvention through realms of migrants’ everyday work and activity, artistic production, and imaginative, representational practices.  Extending her interests in artistic production and creativity in urban settings, Olga is now working on a new ethnographic project on the contemporary art scene in Mumbai, begun in 2011.

Danielle Tan

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Centre for European Studies/College of Asia and the Pacific
Australian National University (ANU), Canberra
Australia
(email)

Thanks to an Erasmus Mundus fellowship, Danielle Tan is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra, affiliated both with the Centre for European Studies and the College of Asia and Pacific. Her main research interests include comparative politics and political economy of Southeast Asia with an emphasis on the rise of China in the context of regional integration in the Greater Mekong Subregion. In December 2011, she completed her PhD in Political Science at Sciences Po/CERI (Centre for International Studies and Research) in Paris, France. Her dissertation was entitled "From Communism to Neoliberalism: the Part Played by Chinese Networks in the Transformation of the State in Laos". She is also co-editing a book collection with Pál Nyíri, gathering the most recent research on the new Chinese migration in Southeast Asia.

Nira Wickramasinghe (Session Chair)

Professor of Modern South Asian Studies
LIAS (Chair)
Leiden University
The Netherlands
(email)

My primary interests are identity politics, everyday life under colonialism and the relationship between state and society in modern South Asia. I have pursued these interests through investigation into such diverse themes as politics of dress, civil society, citizens and migrants, and objects of consumption. Trained as a historian, I have written on late colonial and modern Sri Lanka, using a variety of archives. In the last few years, my work has moved from a focus on national history albeit from a non-state perspective to an approach that contests the nation as a frame and attempts to capture other dimensions of belonging which might be best encapsulated in the term ‘‘postnational’’. I am currently working on a book on ordinary peoples’ encounter with the ‘‘modern’’ using as a lens machines such as the sewing machine, gramophone, tram and bicycle. In addition to my research and teaching I intervene regularly in public debates and contribute essays and op.eds to Opendemocracy and the Wall Street Journal.

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Last Modified: 14-08-2012